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Do You Need Some Summer Reading Suggestions?

The Library maintains several lists that will help you find good reading suggestions. Our Books & Reading pages are always a good place to start. Here you will find links to our Booklists, lists of recommended Websites about books and plenty of staff reviews of Fiction, Nonfiction and Children's books. Booklists:ChildrenTeenAdult fictionAdult nonfictionIf you still can't find anything to read, we have a form to fill out to get a Personalized Reading Suggestion. Happy Reading!

Logan Library's Children's Summer Theater Group

If you are between the ages of 5 and 14 and like acting and fun, we need your HELP! Join our Children's Summer Theater Group!The first meeting will be on Tuesday June 9, 2015 at 10:00 AM. It's free to join, but you must sign up HERE.Adult volunteers are also welcome. Please email Sherrie at sherrie.mortensen@loganutah.org

A MEAT SMOKING MANIFESTO

WordSalad: Brigham City Library Blog - Wed, 06/03/2015 - 1:44pm
I love everything about Franklin Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto by Aaron Franklin and Jordan Mackay. I initially got this book for my daughter, who is an amateur smoker always looking to improve. However, once I started reading, I couldn't put it down. I didn't get halfway through the book before wanting to run to the store to get a quality brisket and make my own smoker.
The first chapter of this book is dedicated to how Franklin took his interest in smoking meat from a hobby to a food truck to the successful lunch-only restaurant he runs today. I was really interested in the back story and appreciated his insight into starting a business and following your passion.
Chapters 2, 3 & 4 are The Smoker, Wood, and Fire + Smoke. The Smoker covers everything from how to choose your smoker to building your own. In Wood, Franklin discusses how to find the best wood to use in your smoker and how to find a good source for it. Fire + Smoke is devoted to building a fire and creating that magical smoke that will take your meat from good to great. This may sound boring, between the style of writing and the details, I found all of it fascinating.
Chapters 5, 6 & 7 are Meat, The Cook, and Serving + Eating. Meat is an incredibly interesting chapter on how to choose good meat and some of the "behind the scenes" from Francklin's restaurant. I went to the store armed with all sorts of things to look for in order to find meat that would be worthy of the time it took to smoke it. The Cook prepares you for smoking your meat and includes a few recipes. At first, I was a bit disappointed at the vagueness of Francklin's recipes. However, he encourages the home smoker to start smoking and develop their own tastes and recipes and I see the value of his words.

Summer Reading Programs 2015 Start Today

There are heroes everywhere: real-life heroes as well as the superheroes you find in movies, books, comics, and TV shows. Every one of these heroes has their own story. Come discover some of their stories this summer at the Logan Library! Children's Activities:Superhero Story Hours: Tuesday or Wednesday - 11:00 a.m.Spanish-language Storytime: Wednesday morning - 10:00 a.m.Fun activities: Thursday afternoon - 2:00 p.m.Hero Movies: Friday afternoon - 2:00 p.m.Teen Activities:Read: Track your reading and win prizesWrite: Review something you've read, watched, seen, or listened to and be entered into a monthly drawing for an iPod shufflePlay: Attend two of our teen programs in one month and be entered into a monthly drawing for an iPod shuffleAdult Reading Program:Reading Bookmarks for tracking your reading timeWrite book reviews Reading Bingo ChallengeAll entries will be entered into a prize drawingJoin us, beginning on Monday June 1st. For more information, click here!

Drama Online

Harold B. Lee Library News - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 2:52pm

Visit the library’s database page and you will find Drama Online. This new database provide quick and easy access to a wide range of plays from classics to contemporary. Their tag line is “1000+ plays 100+ scholarly works.”

You can not only read the plays but you have access to interactive play tools that help you envision the works.

 

Click here for a head start.

Fall 2015, Rose Marie Reid: The Mormon Designer Who Built a Swimsuit Empire

Harold B. Lee Library News - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 2:12pm

This fall the library will open a large exhibition on LDS businesswoman Rose Marie Reid.

Rose Marie Reid: The Mormon Designer Who Built a Swimsuit Empire

Located on level 1 of the library in the L. Tom Perry Special Collections (the exhibit space currently hosting an exhibition on World War I) the exhibition will feature information on the business built by Ms. Reid along with examples of swimwear she designed. We’ll share more as the opening date approaches.

Summer Reading Program 2015

This summer you can have fun reading and win prizes too! Our annual Summer Reading Programs start Monday, June 1st and we have programs for every age group. All three programs give you the chance to win prizes simply for reading! Every Hero Has a Story - for children 10 and under. UNMASK - for teens ages 11-17.Dreaming of Paradise - for all adults.Happy summer reading!

Searching them Middle Kingdom For Buried Treasure

WordSalad: Brigham City Library Blog - Thu, 05/21/2015 - 11:10am
Searching the Middle Kingdom For Buried TreasureSue Hill4.5 StarsMay 21, 2015
The Porcelain ThiefHuan Hsu back to book
I've read many memoirs, so was excited to see a new take in Huan Hsu's "The Porcelain Thief." I was drawn in from the very beginning and felt like I was parting with a good friend when the book ended. Hsu is a fabulous writer. I love his honesty and his bluntness when things don't go according to plan in China. And he weaves in Chinese history that makes it fascinating even for those who know how things turn out along the way. I found myself laughing, crying, and wanting to slam my fist down in frustration as he trekked through China in search of his great-great grandfather's lost porcelain. But there is so much more to his story than that. It's also a personal journey in search of identity and acceptance. He writes about many family members, so the family tree at the beginning is helpful. My favorite characters besides Hsu include his colorful uncles Richard and Lewis, along with his cousin Andrew. Huan Hsu's great-great grandfather would be very proud of this book.

Top Tens

WordSalad: Brigham City Library Blog - Wed, 05/20/2015 - 2:07pm
Check out some of our top ten booksin different collections . . .Sign-up for the LibraryLetter to get a quarterly list of the Library's top tens in your inbox.
 
Top Ten Circulating Titles - New Books (Physical Collection)(In the past 6 months)

 
Top Ten Circulating Titles - Picture Books (Physical Collection)(In the past 6 months)

 
Top Ten Circulating Titles - Children's (Physical Collection)(In the past 6 months)


Top Ten Circulating Titles - Young Adult (Physical Collection)(In the past 6 months)

 
Top Ten Circulating Titles - General Adult Fiction (Physical Collection)(In the past 6 months)

 
Top Ten Circulating Titles - Mystery Adult Fiction (Physical Collection)(In the past 6 months)

 
Top Ten Circulating Titles - Non-Fiction (Physical Collection)(In the past 6 months)


 Top Ten Circulating Titles - eBooks (OverDrive)(In the past 6 months)


Top Ten Circulating Titles - Audiobooks (OverDrive)(In the past 6 months)



Top Ten Circulating Titles - Audiobooks (One Click Digital)(In the past 6 months)



Top Ten Circulating Titles - Christian Fiction (Physical Collection)(In the past 6 months)


Top Ten Circulating Titles - LDS Fiction (Physical Collection)(In the past 6 months)




Library Closed for Memorial Day

The library will be closed on Monday, May 25 in recognition of the Memorial Day holiday. We will resume normal business hours on Tuesday, May 26.

Library Power Outage on Level 3 This Weekend

Harold B. Lee Library News - Tue, 05/19/2015 - 12:28pm

Some parts of the main floor of the Harold B. Lee Library will be without power, lights, and possibly wifi this weekend. Starting on Friday evening the Learning Commons will turn off the public computers in anticipation of electrical work. The library will also take advantage of the holiday weekend to perform required maintenance on the library’s catalog system. Most of the library will be open as usual and the majority of the library’s online resources will be available through lib.byu.edu.

Book checkout may be relocated to the Reading Room on level 2 if it becomes necessary.

Why children need more than ebooks

WordSalad: Brigham City Library Blog - Fri, 05/15/2015 - 12:04pm



In Praise of Print
Given the focus on ebooks these days, could old-fashioned print books provide a superior reading experience? Actually, yes – especially for young children whose literacy skills are just beginning to emerge. Here are eight reasons to keep recommending traditional books.
   1.  No need to make choices. Lacking hyperlinks, paper books enable total immersion in reading – no need to continually pause and ask, “Should I click on this?”
2 2.  No distractions within the text. Research suggests that the visual and aural gimmicks and game-like features embedded in many kids’ ebooks draw young readers’ attention from the written words, diminishing their memory of what was read.
3 3.  No Internet temptations. The only thing you can do with a paper book I read it, while with Web-enabled ereaders, the temptations of the Interment are a click away.
4 4.  Imagination required. Without the bells and whistles of ebooks, young readers must mobilize their own imaginations to fill in the gaps left by authors and illustrators: what a character looks like, for example or the sound an animal makes.
5 5.  Satisfaction of the senses. The smooth feel of paper and the rich colors of illustrations are laragely lost in ebook reproductions. The distinctiveness of the reading experience is reduced, as well – such as when an oversized picture book is squeezed down to the size of an ereader screen.
6 6.  Literary attitudes. Children accustomed to using digital devices for fast-aced entertainment may approach an ereader with the same expectations, while a printed book comes with an entirely different set of associations: a quiet focus on words and stories.
   7.  Easy to share. A printed book lends itself to being shared by children and adults, while an ebook may not be shared quite so easily. Research suggest that parents reading ebooks with their children are less likely to stop and ask questions or make comments, and more likely to issue commands. (Swipe the page now, Don’t touch that button)
   8.Strong selection. The number of quality children’s books published in paper still vastly outnumbers those available in a digital format. Research suggests that the ebooks selected most often by children and parents are more akin to movies than to books, and thus dubious value in promoting emerging literacy.

Six Degrees of Acronyms: BYU in the DPLA

Harold B. Lee Library News - Thu, 05/14/2015 - 2:48pm

The new Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) is a great resource for content about our country. What most people don’t know is the The Harold B. Lee Library (HBLL) was one of the early contributors to the system.

The Lee library is part of the Utah Academic Library Consortium (UALC), a group of university and college libraries who have teamed up to improve libraries. UALC created the Mountain West Digital Library (MWDL). The MWDL is run by a small team of dedicated, creative, and very effective people who have built a collection of images and other content from across the intermountain west. As the MWDL collections grew, along came the DPLA and the great folks at the MWDL, who jumped at the chance to participate. Suddenly, people throughout the country now have easy access to many of the Lee Library’s images through a nationally known system.

If you pay attention, you will find content from BYU appearing in papers and articles around the internet.

 

 (Coach Romney in ‘Counselor at Law,’ 1930s. Courtesy University Archives, L. Tom Perry Special Collections, Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University, via Mountain West Digital Library.)

 

So, BYU-HBLL-UALC-MWDL-DPLA-You

I bet you had no idea that it took so many acronyms to get great content on the Internet.

Thoughts on the American Fork Public Library, in Utah

Utah Libraries - Wed, 03/11/2015 - 7:47am
By Colleen B. Eggett, American Fork Public Library Director Sperling’s Best Places describes American Fork, Utah as a wonderful, happening place. The growth rate is rapid and it’s a marvelous place to raise a family.  There is room to grow. There are two major universities nearby, outstanding natural resources, and it’s close to absolutely everything while remaining … Continue reading Thoughts on the American Fork Public Library, in Utah

eBooks and eAudiobooks: What the Vendors Didn’t Tell Us

Utah Libraries - Sun, 02/22/2015 - 9:33am
By Colleen B. Eggett What should librarians teach their customers about the eBooks and eAudiobooks that they provide through various vendors such as OverDrive, OneClick Digital, 3M Cloud Library, Axis 360, and others? I recommend that you teach That you have the eBooks The details of your library’s program: How many items can be checked … Continue reading eBooks and eAudiobooks: What the Vendors Didn’t Tell Us

OITP developing digital literacy portfolio, engaging with NTIA on Digital Literacy Portal

ALA Direct Dispatch - Thu, 02/03/2011 - 3:29pm

The ALA Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP) is in the process of developing a digital literacy portfolio.  During Midwinter, OITP staff began meeting with a range of ALA member groups to learn more about current efforts and to help inform the portfolio development.  One outcome of the Midwinter meetings is that OITP’s Advisory Committee is supporting an OITP task force that would delve into digital literacy issues and include representatives from interested ALA units.  A formal proposal to the Advisory Committee is forthcoming, after which time OITP will connect with other ALA units to establish task force membership.

OITP also is in communication with the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), one of the government agencies working on digital literacy issues as an outgrowth of recommendations made in the National Broadband Plan.  The Digital Literacy Portal is one of the initiatives underway at NTIA.  NTIA has issued a request for organizations – including libraries – that are engaged in digital literacy projects to submit content to be considered for inclusion in NTIA’s Digital Literacy Portal.  A description of the Portal may be found here (pdf) and the content and comment policy is described here (pdf).

OITP will be coordinating with NTIA staff in the collection of library content for the Digital Literacy Portal.  As we are confirming the details of this collaboration, we encourage members to copy us on any submission to the portal and send any comments or other questions you may have to oitp@alawash.org.

The Digital Literacy Portal is a complex undertaking, and staff at NTIA are working diligently to make sure that content on the portal is collected from a wide range of community-based organizations – including libraries.

Save the date! National Library Legislative Day to be held on May 9 and 10

ALA Direct Dispatch - Thu, 02/03/2011 - 2:57pm

The 2011 National Library Legislative Day is quickly approaching and will be held on Monday, May 9, and Tuesday, May 10, at the Liaison Hotel in Washington, D.C.

Many changes in Congress now contribute to a new political climate in both the House and the Senate.  New members need to hear from their constituents. Be sure to register early – the American Library Association has reserved a block of rooms at the hotel, but they always go quickly!

The American Library Association, Chief Officers of State Library Agencies and the District of Columbia Library Association sponsor National Library Legislative Day.  We look forward to seeing you soon!

ALA urges library supporters to push for passage of USA PATRIOT Act Sunset Extension Act of 2011

ALA Direct Dispatch - Wed, 02/02/2011 - 2:00pm

The ALA Washington Office is urging all library supporters to ask members of the Senate Judiciary Committee to pass S. 193, the USA PATRIOT Act Sunset Extension Act of 2011.

Click here for background information and talking points.

Library Copyright Alliance releases paper on Costco v. Omega non-decision

ALA Direct Dispatch - Wed, 02/02/2011 - 12:58pm

The ALA as part of the Library Copyright Alliance (LCA) has released a paper exploring the Costco v. Omega non-decision. The document, titled “The Impact of the Supreme Court’s Decision in Costco v. Omega on Libraries” prepared by Jonathan Band details legal options in the copyright law that support libraries who lend foreign-made copies in their collections.

ALA seeks nominations for 2011 L. Ray Patterson Copyright Award

ALA Direct Dispatch - Mon, 01/31/2011 - 11:19am

Contact: Jenni Terry
Press Officer
ALA Washington Office
(202) 628-8410
For Immediate Release

Washington, D.C. – The American Library Association’s (ALA) Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP) is calling for nominations for the 2011 L. Ray Patterson Copyright Award. This annual award honors individuals or groups who embody the spirit of the U.S. copyright law as voiced by the framers of our Constitution: “to advance the knowledge of science and useful arts” (U.S. Constitution, art 1, sec 8). 

Please send letters of nomination outlining a candidate’s qualifications for this award to Carrie Russell, Director, Program on Public Access to Information, ALA OITP, 1615 New Hampshire Avenue NW, First Floor, Washington, DC 20009, or to crussell@alawash.org.  Include examples of how the nominee has contributed to the pursuit of the fundamental tenets of copyright law. Nominees who have worked or collaborated with libraries will be given special consideration. Nominations will be accepted through March 15, 2011. 

Patterson was a foremost legal thinker, writer and champion of users’ rights. He was a pioneer who exposed the restrictive nature of new interpretations and unnecessary expansions of contemporary copyright law. For librarians, Patterson was a key legal figure who articulated how corporate interests have sidetracked the true purpose of copyright – to advance learning and to ensure that knowledge is broadly disseminated to the public.  Through numerous books, articles, and briefs, Patterson highlighted and justified the importance of the public domain and fair use. 

The award was founded by the ALA in 2002; a list of past awardees can be found on OITP’s Web site.

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